Mexican Grilled Corn

 I love grilling season and since I live in Florida that’s pretty much all year. It wasn’t always that way. I used to live up north in the frozen tundra of Michigan which has about 6 months of normal grilling season (unless you’re one of those die-hards who grills from your garage after you’re done snow blowing the driveway).  It’s also where I first tried the most amazingly flavorful take on corn on the cob known as Mexican Grilled Corn or Street Corn, or if you want to get real; Elote. I had always eaten corn on the cob with butter and salt; never like this. Recently I saw Mexican Grilled Streat Corn as an appetizer at a local Mexican restaurant and wanted to make it at home. I had pinned this pin for Mexican Grilled Corn by Veronica of The Vegetarian Ginger and was ready to try it.
Pintesting Mexican Grilled Corn
It’s time to do this Pintesting.

The Pintesting

The ingredients include grilled corn, spices, mayonnaise, and cheese.

Pintesting Mexican Grilled Corn
First, brush the corn with olive oil and season with salt and pepper. Then grill it until it’s done, turning it every few minutes so that it cooks evenly; for a total of about 10 minutes or so. My HH did this part since he’s our grillmaster.

Mayonnaise? Yes, mayo. If you’ve never tried this just trust me on this. It’s how this is done.

Pintesting Mexican Grilled Corn

Slather a good coat of mayonnaise on the corn like butter.

Pintesting Mexican Grilled Corn
 Coat the corn well so that the seasoning blend will stick.
Pintesting Mexican Grilled CornBlend the mixture of spices and then sprinkle all sides of the corn as liberally as you’d like. Don’t worry if it looks like a lot; the seasoning blend is more flavorful than spicy hot.
Pintesting Mexican Grilled Corn
 Finish by sprinkling all sides of the corn with the grated Parmesan cheese. Go ahead and coat it well.
Pintesting Mexican Grilled Corn
This is going to get all over your fingers – and you’re going to be very glad about that. This tastes so good! We were making all kinds of Mmm and Yum sounds while we ate.

The 2nd Pintesting:

I made this again within a week, except this time I used the more traditional Cotija cheese. It’s a Mexican hard crumbly cow’s milk cheese described as similar to both parmesan and feta. It crumbled easily onto the corn and I can see why it’s perfect for Elote.

Pintesting Mexican Grilled Corn

Notice the little shaker of the spice blend above the cotija? We liked the first Pintesting results so much that we mixed the blend ahead to use whenever we want to grill some Mexican Street Corn.

Pintesting Mexican Grilled Corn

This time I only got a picture of one because they disappeared as soon as I could make them. Something about hungry people wanting delicious food. My HH likes the Cotija cheese better – he says it’s creamier than the parmesan and he is not wrong.

A few notes on this Pintesting:
  • DON’T mix everything and then spread it on the corn. Read the recipe directions thoroughly and follow the steps or you’ll have an unpleasant mess.
  • DO let a grill master grill the corn for you while you assemble the remaining ingredients if you have someone else doing the grilling.
  • DO be as subtle or generous with the spice mixture and cheese as you’d like. I was moderate with the seasoning and heavier with the cheese.
  • DO use either the Parmesan or Cotija cheese – or even a mixture if you’d like. They’re both delicious. My HH likes the Cotija better – he says it’s creamier.
  • DO have a napkin ready but feel free to lick your fingers.

The Pintesting Results

Overall Results: 4.85 Pins
Pintesting Seal 5 Pins

Accuracy:  This recipe turned out just like the Veronica said that it would and it tasted just like the Mexican Grilled Street Corn that I remember from the street vendors. 5 Pins

Pintesting Rating - 5 Pins
Difficulty:  The directions were clear and easy to follow. Grill. Schmear. Blend. Sprinkle. Sprinkle. Eat. However, since there is open flame involved I’m giving this 4 Pins.
Pintesting Rating - 5 Pins
Time:  The total time for this was about 20 minutes including the corn shucking, grilling, and seasoning. It times out well if you’re grilling burgers, kabobs, steak, or anything else. 5 Pins
Pintesting Rating - 5 Pins
Cost:  Corn on the cob is very inexpensive in the summer. I got 5 ears of corn for $2. The mayonnaise and spices were already in my cupboard and are common to most kitchens as is grated parmesan. The total cost for Veronica’s recipe with parmesan was less than $3 or $0.60 per serving. The cotija cheese was $5.49 for a bag that will make at least 10 recipes so it has no impact on the price per serving. 5 Pins
Pintesting Rating - 5 Pins
Practicality:  We have already made this 3 times since the first Pintesting and I’m sure we’ll make it often. Whichever cheese option you choose, this is great to serve with Mexican food, grilled food, as an appetizer, and it’s vegetarian, too. The spice blend can be adjusted to suit your taste and can be applied as lightly or as generously as you’d like. 5 Pins
Pintesting Rating - 5 Pins

Chuck Roast with Balsamic and Dijon

Pintesting Chuck Roast with Balsamic and Dijon

There are some things that I’ve never or have almost never cooked; one of them is a roast. I know, it’s shocking! I’ve made soufflés, Beef Wellington, risottos, and many other dishes that are supposed to be complicated or “expert level” long before I made my first roast. Why? Because all my life my mother, the in-laws, or my HH have made it. Recently the grocery store had chuck roasts on sale, and I decided it was finally time to make my first roast. A search of my Pinterest pins for roasts brought up lots of recipes, but most of them were slow cooker recipes and I wanted a traditional oven-roasted version. Thankfully I had pinned this pin for Chuck Roast with Balsamic and Dijon by Kristy of The Wicked Noodle. It was just what I was looking for; oven-roasted with carrots, potatoes, and a self-made gravy.

Pintesting Chuck Roast with Balsamic and Dijon

The Pintesting:

I don’t know why, but I thought that roasts required magical ingredients to make them turn out delicious. I was so wrong. These basic ingredients are all that’s needed. The peas are my own addition, but I’ll get to that later.

Pintesting Chuck Roast with Balsamic and Dijon

First season the roast with salt and pepper.

Pintesting Chuck Roast with Balsamic and Dijon

Next, heat the pan and oil to sear the roast on one side.

Pintesting Chuck Roast with Balsamic and Dijon

Then sear the other side.

Pintesting Chuck Roast with Balsamic and Dijon

Remove the roast and add onions.

Pintesting Chuck Roast with Balsamic and Dijon

Cook the onions until they are soft.

Pintesting Chuck Roast with Balsamic and Dijon

Next, add the balsamic vinegar and cook until it’s reduced and syrupy, then add the Dijon mustard.

Pintesting Chuck Roast with Balsamic and Dijon

Put the meat back in, add the broth and thyme, then roast in the oven.

Pintesting Chuck Roast with Balsamic and Dijon

The meat should be tender and fall apart.

Pintesting Chuck Roast with Balsamic and Dijon

Add the potatoes and carrots and cook longer.

Pintesting Chuck Roast with Balsamic and Dijon

When the potatoes are thoroughly cooked, you’re all done.

Pintesting Chuck Roast with Balsamic and Dijon

Plate your dinner and show off your masterpiece.

Pintesting Chuck Roast with Balsamic and Dijon

Now for the peas. This is one thing that my HH prefers to NOT be cooked with the roast. I’ve always liked them with the roasted veggies. Since one of the keys to a great marriage is knowing when and how to compromise, I cooked the peas separately and served them smothered in the gravy. We both agreed that this was a delicious recipe and as the resident roast maker, he declared my first roast a complete success. High praise, indeed.

The Pintesting Results:

Overall Results: 4.4 Pins

Pintesting Seal 4 Pins

Accuracy:  This recipe turned out exactly like Kristy’s pictures. The roast was very tender and juicy. The balsamic and dijon gave a nice twist to the traditional chuck roast. The potatoes and carrots were perfectly tender without being mushy. 5 Pins

Pintesting Rating - 5 Pins

Difficulty:  There are no difficult techniques to this dish. However, I am giving this 4 Pins because you transfer a hot dutch oven from the stovetop to the oven.

Pintesting Rating - 4 Pins

Time:  Preparing the roast took very little time; about 15 minutes. Since this takes several hours to cook, however, I’m giving this 3 Pins.

Rated 3 Pins

Cost:  I happened to get my chuck roast on sale, but even so it was more than $16 just for the meat. The dish made 6 servings and the total cost was about $25 which is $4 per serving. That’s not bad for a full dinner. 4 Pins

Pintesting Rating - 4 Pins

Practicality: This is a great dinner and worth the time it takes to make. The next time I try this I’ll make it in the slow cooker since they cook themselves all day on low. The flavor and texture were perfect – just like Sunday Supper. 5 Pins

Pintesting Rating - 5 Pins